segunda-feira, 15 de Setembro de 2014

quarta-feira, 10 de Setembro de 2014

segunda-feira, 8 de Setembro de 2014

quinta-feira, 10 de Julho de 2014

Puppy!


Bel été, disent-ils... :)



quinta-feira, 26 de Junho de 2014

terça-feira, 17 de Junho de 2014

As nossas compras na Feira do Livro / What we bought at the Book Fair

















Be-a-Ba: mapa-mundi com autocolantes, plesiossauro em puzzle 4D.
Booksmile: A Casa da Bicharada.
Edicare: Dinossauros, Atividades no País Imaginário, dois brinquedos científicos.
Kalandraka: Inventário das Árvores (e o melhor saquinho de toda a Feira :)
Pavilhão dos Pequenos Editores: My First Bedtime Stories.
Porto Editora: Livro de Atividades da Ovelha Choné, Cola e Descola com As Roupas, GRU - Meu Pai, o Supervilão.

quarta-feira, 4 de Junho de 2014

quinta-feira, 22 de Maio de 2014

Save the Trees


Stone Girl, Bone Girl - the story of Mary Anning of Lyme Regis

Recommended by A Mighty Girl. Click to buy from Amazon UK




















Mary Anning, born in England in 1799, made an astounding discovery at age 12 when she unearthed the first full skeleton of a giant ichthyosaur in the cliffs above her home in Lyme Regis. This incident -- in which she was helped by a little dog she rescued from a cemetery -- was the beginning of a long career that saw Mary become the world's best-known fossil hunter.
Best-selling author Laurence Anholt turns Mary's fascinating life into a perfect read-aloud, while Sheila Moxley's luscious pictures vividly evoke the coastal setting and dramas of Mary's exciting life.

quarta-feira, 21 de Maio de 2014

That Spielberg fella... :)

Disgraceful photo of Spielberg happily posing next to a Triceratops he just killed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We need to name and shame these bigshot directors, thinking they can wantonly kill innocent dinosaurs.

found at imgur

Mary Anning - Happy 215th Birthday!

(and I am finally reading Remarkable Creatures, by Tracy Chevalier)


Dinossauros às Quintas (uma quinta cheia de dinossauros? Ai...)

blogue Lusodinos, evento no Facebook




sexta-feira, 16 de Maio de 2014

segunda-feira, 12 de Maio de 2014

terça-feira, 22 de Abril de 2014

quinta-feira, 17 de Abril de 2014

segunda-feira, 7 de Abril de 2014

sexta-feira, 4 de Abril de 2014

quarta-feira, 26 de Março de 2014

segunda-feira, 24 de Março de 2014

Now don't Chicken Out, meet Anzu wyliei, the largest oviraptosaurus :)

From io9:
Say hello to Anzu wyliei, a newly discovered Cretaceous era dinosaur that roamed the Dakotas 66 million years ago. Measuring nearly 12 feet long and weighing over 600 pounds, it's the largest oviraptorosaur ever discovered in North America.
"We jokingly call this thing the 'chicken from hell,' and I think that's pretty appropriate," noted paleontologist Matt Lamanna of the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh in a statement. His team's analysis of three partial skeletons, which were uncovered from the uppermost level of the Hell Creek rock formation in North and South Dakota, now appears in PLoS One
More formally, the feathered dinosaur is named after Anzu, a bird-like demon from Mesopotamian mythology, and wyliei after a boy named Wylie, the dinosaur-loving grandson of a Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh trustee.
Between the three partial skeletons, the paleontologists were practically able to reconstruct the whole thing. Living amongst Tyrannosaurus rex and Triceratops, the newly discovered dinosaur measured 11.5 feet (3.5 meters) long and almost five feet (1.5 meters) tall at the hip. It weighed an estimated 440 to 660 pounds (200 to 300 kg). Living during the Late Cretaceous, it was wiped out by an asteroid (or some other mass-extinction-inducing event) 65 million years ago along with its contemporaries. 
As noted, it's the largest oviraptorosaur ever discovered in North America — a group of dinosaurs closely related to birds who often exhibited cassowary-like crests on their heads (a cassowary being a flightless bird found in New Guinea and Australia). They were probably omnivores, foraging on vegetation, small animals, and perhaps eggs while living on wet floodplains.
And if the fossilized remains are of any indication, these things got into their fair share of scraps and mishaps. One dinosaur had a broken and healed rib, while another showed signs trauma to a toe.


Pets over Princes :), or the Art of Wrong Hands


I am the Walrus, asleep on a Russian submarine :)



If you find a Baby Songbird out of the nest, or the Art of Bird and Moon Comics


T-Rex vs Megalodon - size comparison


sexta-feira, 21 de Março de 2014

The Nature Connection Pyramid


Dr. Scott Sampson - Get outside, get into Nature

Paleontologist Scott Sampson, chief curator of the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, is using his passion for Tyrannosaurus Rex and the gang to encourage America’s most indoor-oriented generation to get outside and explore nature.
Sampson—or "Dr. Scott," as he's known to millions of young fans around the world, hosts the Emmy-award-nominated PBS kids show Dinosaur TrainThe show is two parts fun and one part science, blending vibrant animation and catchy tunes with a live-action educational segment hosted by Dr. Scott himself. 
Dinosaur Train encourages kids to go outside and make their own discoveries," said Sampson, during an interview with The Trust for Public Land for the family issue of Land&People. "They’re getting out there and engaging with nature, looking for plants and bugs and birds because they’re encouraged to do so on the show.”  

So what are Dr. Scott's tips to get kids excited about the natural world?

1) "Start in the backyard or the park. Ask your child to pick one aspect of nature that they’re most interested in—it could be anything ... a cloud, a plant, or a bug. Then give them a piece of paper and a pencil and ask them to closely observe the item and draw it—or maybe write a couple of notes about it." 

2) "They’ll see structures they've never noticed before in a blade of grass, or veins in a leaf, the feel of bark on a tree, and they'll write down their observations. Just by doing that, they've started a nature journal. Encourage them to do this for five minutes a day, to sit and write about what they hear, what they see, what they feel." 

3) "Next, make a game out of this activity. How many different types of animals can you see in the next ten minutes? How many different plants can you find in the backyard?”